BDC’s Next Top Model: Amberlyn Wemmer


images1Amberlyn Wemmer
studied in Broadway Dance Center’s Professional Semester back in the fall of 2010.  Since moving from small town California to the Big Apple, Amberlyn has literally graced the runway thanks to her extensive ballet training. Hear how Amberlyn’s dance background helped her to break into the modeling industry:

1) How did you break into modeling? (ie. photo shoots, landing an agent, booking work, etc.)

An agency owner approached me in Union Square and asked if I was interested in modeling. I had never really seen myself as a model but was curious to see what it would be like. I said sure, and they signed me right after. Then, I started test shooting right away in order build a portfolio. Once I had a book, I started attending castings and go-sees. At first, I was doing mostly runway. Booking editorials took time and patience but once the contacts were made and my book got strong, I was able to get more work.

 

2) Do you think your dance background helps you in modeling? If so, how?

My dance background has helped immensely in modeling, and I think it is what makes my book unique. As dancers we study our bodies everyday and understand how we look and emotions we project. Instead of a mirror in front of you, it’s a camera in modeling, and it’s your job to create shapes, movement, and energy to bring you and the product to life. It is never just a picture; there is purpose behind each position. As for runway, dance core strength you have acquired in class becomes a plus. Just think of it this way, dancing in LaDuca’s is the prep work for walking in the 8 ½ heels.


images43) How is the modeling world similar/different to the dance world in terms of lifestyle, auditions, booking work, etc.?

No matter what industry you enter whether dance or modeling, it is always going to be competitive. It is important to find your own identity and how to market yourself. In both the dance and modeling world, your body is your instrument and you only get one so it’s important that you take care of it and how it looks with a balanced diet, sleep, and exercise. For most model castings, it is usually a “type cast”, which can sometimes be very frustrating. For dance, maybe your technique is not up to par so you hop in a few more dance classes; however, in modeling, it may have nothing to do with your ability but simply you are not what they are looking for. In that case, you move on to the next, and you may be perfect for that one. You never really know what a photographer might be looking for.


images54) What has been your favorite(s) shoot so far? Have you gotten to travel anywhere exciting?

I have really enjoyed shoots where I am challenged to create a different persona. It is about becoming someone who may or may not be like you. My favorite shoots are always where we are collaborating together- the makeup artist, stylist, photographer, and model. I absolutely love when I have shot for Nylon magazine. We always have so much fun that it hardly seems like work. I had the honor of traveling to Mexico City for three months, which was amazing! There is such a diverse market there that is up and coming. I cannot wait to see where I travel next. I am hoping for Europe!


images65) What advice do you have for dancers who want to break into modeling?

My advice for dancers breaking into modeling would be taking pictures takes practice. Like dance, there is technique, and it is only with practice that you can improve body language and emotion to make an aesthetically pleasing picture. More importantly, remember your dance foundation. People find dancers fascinating and that makes you stand out. Use your training to your advantage on the runway and in your pictures. It makes you unique and gives you a certain rhythm, grace, and awareness. In whatever field you choose though, don’t give up despite the criticism. Use your instrument to define you and your art.

Advertisements