Theater Review: Nice Work If You Can Get It

images1Saturday was what I like to call a “matinee kind of a day.”   After work I walked through the crowds of people and the scorching heat to the s’wonderful, s’marvelous, air-conditioned Imperial Theatre, just a block east of Broadway Dance Center.  At 1:30pm I was still able to purchase a student ticket for the 2pm show (clutch?) and took my seat in the mezzanine of the beautiful theater.  Sometimes theaters will place student ticket-holders in the “worst” seats in the house (ie. far corners in the front or back, partial viewed seating,etc.), but that was not at all my experience! Check out tickets here.
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This was my second time seeing “Nice Work If You Can Get It,” having seen it back in April during previews for my mom’s birthday.  I decided to see the show again after taking Samantha Sturm’s “Nice Work” master class at BDC.  [*Jeffrey “Shecky” Schecter, who has taught several BDC master classes in the past as part of BDC’s Broadway Choreography Series, is also part of the show!].  Back when I saw the show in April, I was so infatuated with the experience itself – seeing a Kathleen Marshall musical starring big-names like Matthew Broderick, Kelli O’Hara, Judy Kaye, and Michael McGrath.  So this time, I focused on (surprise!) the dancing.

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Like I mentioned, Kathleen Marshall directed and choreographed “Nice Work.” Marshall has won three Tony’s and two Drama Desk Awards for “Best Choreography,” so it is no wonder that “Nice Work” has more than just your average “Charleston!”  Ben Brantley (NY Times) noted, “And as fluent as always in the period she means to evoke, Ms. Marshall has drilled her agile dancers to perform every possible variation on the Charleston.”

“To choreograph on Broadway it’s really important to know style.  This is a show that takes place in the ’20s, the last show I did [“Anything Goes”] took place in the ’30s, so I think it’s important to understand different eras and different styles.  Look at old movies, watch old TV shows, watch old MGM musicals, old “Fred and Ginger” musicals…understand how those classic musicals “work” and then you can turn around and make it your own.”

~ Kathleen Marshall

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